Budget Information

Budget Vote

2021-2022 Budget Development

-The Board will be adopting the budget on April 14.

-Due to the tax billing error, the approved tax levy of $8,492,589 was actually levied at $8,110,335 – this resulted in residents receiving a decrease in the school tax bills.

-The $8,110,335 was used as the prior year levy in the tax cap calculation, this along with a low growth factor only allowed the district to increase the levy by $30,675. This has created a revenue shortfall. The budget deficit is currently at $989,817. To close the gap, the district is recommending a 6% increase in the tax levy. The district has had no increase in the tax levy since 2012.

2021 Meetings and Presentations

Public Hearing 5/5/21
BOE Meeting Video Link 4/14/21
BOE Budget Presentation 4/14/21
BOE Budget Workshop Video Link 4/13/21
BOE Budget Workshop Presentation 4/13/21
BOE Budget Workshop Meeting Video Link 3/31/21
BOE Budget Workshop 3/31/21 Presentation
BOE Budget Workshop Meeting Video Link 3/16/21
BOE Budget Workshop 3/16/21 Presentation
BOE Budget Presentation 3/10/21

2020-21 Budget Resources

2021-2022 Budget Newsletter
2020-2021 Budget Newsletter
Budget Presentation January 15, 2020, 7 p.m. JSHS Library
Budget Presentation February 12, 2020, 7 p.m. JSHS Library
Budget Presentation March 11, 2020, 7 p.m. WBH Library
Budget Presentation April 8, 2020, Virtual Board Meeting
Public Hearing June 2, 2020 (virtual)

Voter Registration Information

Columbia County Board of Elections
Rensselaer County Voter Registration Page

 

Board of Education Elections

Petition to run for Board of Education

Individuals are eligible for election to the Board if they are qualified voters of the district (district resident, U.S. citizen, 18 and older) and can read and write. New York State Education Law does not limit the number of terms of office a member may serve. Board members receive no salaries or other compensation.

 

Financials

Understanding New York’s Property Tax Cap

In June 2011, New York state leaders responded to calls for property tax relief by enacting a law that placed new restrictions on how school districts (and municipalities) may increase their tax levies. Although often referred to as a “2 percent tax cap,” the law does not, in fact, restrict any proposed tax levy increase to 2 percent. It does, however, require at least 60 percent voter approval (supermajority) for a school budget if the proposed levy increase exceeds a certain amount. That amount, called the “tax levy limit,” is calculated by each district according to a complex formula outlined in the law, and varies by district. To help our community understand New York’s Property Tax Cap, we have provided you with informational resources.

Tax Levy Cap Resources

Navigating Through Year 2 of New York’s Property Tax Levy Cap – March 2013
Understanding New York’s Tax Levy Cap – October 2011
New York’s Tax Levy Limit Formula: How does it add up?
The Three Tax Levy Numbers Under New York State’s Tax Levy Cap

2021-22 Financials

Detail Budget 2021-22
Property Tax Report Card 2021-22
Fiscal Accountability
STAR Discount 2020-21
Administrative Salary Notice Disclosure
NYSED Fiscal Report Card
NYSED Academic Report Card
Tax Exemption Report

2020-21 Financials

Detail Budget 2020-21
Property Tax Report Card 2020-21
Fiscal Accountability
STAR Discount 2020-21
Administrative Salary Notice Disclosure
NYSED Fiscal Report Card
NYSED Academic Report Card
Tax Exemption Report

Audits and Reports

-Internal
-External
-2019-2020 Corrective Action Plan
-2019-2020 Extra Classroom Activity Fund Audit CAP
-Comptroller
-Appropriation Status Consolidated Report

Previous Years’ Budgets
View previous years budget documents here.